5 Hacks for Your Busted Battery Powered Vibrator

01
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Intro to Fixing Battery Powered Vibrators

a collection of vibrators and dildos of different colours and shapes all standing.
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It is a sad fact that battery powered vibrators tend to be poorly thought out and have a built-in obsolescence. They are usually less expensive for a reason. While there are always exceptions to the rule, most battery-powered sex toys will last between a couple weeks and a couple years. More reputable sex stores will offer some sort of warranty with their products (the standard seems to be about 30 days).​​

In addition to some preventative measures, there are a few common problems that can be easily checked that may bring your toy back to life. Most problems that can be fixed are related to the batteries and the connections inside the vibrator.

02
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Fixing the Spring

A common problem with older vibrators is that the spring in the cap becomes flattened and no longer keeps a tight connection between the batteries and the connectors at the top and bottom of the vibrator. You can open up your vibrator and gently pull the spring up to reestablish a snug connection.

Be careful not to pull too hard, the spring could snap off and you can find yourself with an impossible soldering job on your hands.

03
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Check for Something Blocking the Connectors

Many cylindrical battery powered vibrators have a piece of plastic or paper inside the battery compartment. This is there to keep the vibrator quieter, by preventing the extra noise of the batteries rattling in the case. Over time this piece of paper can slide down and get lodged in front of the connectors. You can remove this paper or plastic entirely. If your toy begins to make a lot of noise you can replace it with a new rolled up piece of paper.

04
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Pulling up the connectors

Battery powered vibrator caps that do not use a spring to make a connection often have two connectors at the top of the cap. Over time these connectors get depressed and no longer allow for a tight connection (which in turn, could depress the owner of the toy!) Gently lift the connectors up to ensure a snug connection when the cap is closed.

05
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Don't Be Shy About Asking for Help

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For lots of us buying and using sex toys can feel shameful. You may or may not want to work through those feelings of sexual shame but either way, you don't need to suffer through a series of cheap sex toys without any assistance. It might feel weird to ask a sex shop for help but it's what they do. And however you feel about sex toys, they are happy you bought one from them and hope you'll do so again.

All stores should offer some sort of warranty on the product. Many retailers will have spare parts (like caps) that they can give you for free. And some may replace your product even if it's been more than 30 days or whatever warranty they offer. Most won't want you to bring the toy back to the store or even mail it back. The best thing to do is contact the store by email or phone, explain the situation, and ask what they can do to help. You might be surprised.