European Open Golf Tournament: History and Winners

Paul Casey of England celebrates with the trophy after winning the 2019 Porsche European Open at Green Eagle Golf Courses in Hamburg, Germany.
2019 Porsche European Open champ Paul Casey.

 Tom Dulat/Getty Images

The European Open is a golf tournament that is part of the European Tour. It is contested over four rounds (72 holes) played over four days, with stroke play as the format. There is a cut following the second round (36 holes) that trims the field by approximately half.

The full name of the tournament is Porsche European Open, with German automaker Porsche as the title sponsor. The tournament now takes place in Germany. It was played in England for much of its early history, then spent many years in Ireland. Previous tournament names (which change as title sponsors change) include Smurfit Kappa European Open, Smurfit European Open, GA European Open, Panasonic European Open and Dixcel Tissues European Open.

The European Open was first played in 1978. Bobby Wadkins, who never won in 715 starts on the PGA Tour, was the first champion.

Fast Facts: Porsche European Open

  • Short Description: Golf tournament played annually as part of the European Tour, the top-level professional golf tour in Europe.
  • 2020 Dates: September 3-6.
  • Defending Champion: Paul Casey
  • Location: The tournament is played in Germany. The current host course is the North Course at Green Eagle Golf Courses in Hamburg.

Ticket Info

Tickets are cheaper for the first two rounds (Thursday-Friday) than for the weekend rounds (Saturday-Sunday), and also cheaper purchased in advance rather than at the gate. In 2019, tickets for Rounds 1-2 were €25, for Rounds 3-4 €35, purchased in advance.

A weekend pass, good for both weekend days, was €60. Ticket info for 2020 will be posted on the official website's ticket portal when available.

Golf Course

Green Eagle Golf Courses is the complex where the tournament takes place. It includes two courses known as the North and South, and is located in Winsen, a suburb just outside Hamburg, Germany.

The North Course, now the home of the Porsche European Open, opened in 1997. But when it was chosen as the new home of the tournament beginning in 2017, the North Course underwent a renovation by European Golf Design. Chief among the changes was the redesign and construction of six green complexes.

For daily play, the North Course is a par-73 layout that, from the tips, stretches to a daunting 7,831 yards—making it, for now, the longest golf course in Europe. The South Course tips out at 6,598 yards and has a par of 72. There is also a par-3 course and driving range. All are open to the public.

Tournament Scoring Records

The 18-hole scoring record for a round in the European Open is 60, set by Darren Clarke during the 1999 tournament. Clarke made 12 birdies, tying the tour's record for most birdies in a round; and at one point during the round he made a then-record eight consecutive birdies.

The 72-hole tournament record is 260, set by Ian Woosnam in his 1988 victory. And the record for strokes below par is 21-under, set by Per-Ulrik Johansson in 1997.

Winners of the European Open

The tournament record for wins is two, and four golfers share it: Gordon Brand Jr., Bernhard Langer, Per-Ulrik Johansson, and Lee Westwood. Johansson and Westwood each achieved victories in back-to-back years.

This is the list of champions along with winning scores (72 holes, unless otherwise noted):

  • 2019 — Paul Casey, 274
  • 2018 — Richard McEvoy, 277
  • 2017 — Jordan Smith, 275
  • 2016 — Alexander Levy, 194 (54 holes)
  • 2015 — Thongchai Jaidee, 267
  • 2014 — No tournament
  • 2013 — No tournament
  • 2012 — No tournament
  • 2011 — No tournament
  • 2010 — No tournament
  • 2009 — Christian Cevaer, 281
  • 2008 — Ross Fisher, 268
  • 2007 — Colin Montgomerie, 269
  • 2006 — Stephen Dodd, 279
  • 2005 — Kenneth Ferrie, 285
  • 2004 — Retief Goosen, 275
  • 2003 — Phillip Price, 272
  • 2002 — Michael Campbell, 282
  • 2001 — Darren Clarke, 273
  • 2000 — Lee Westwood, 276
  • 1999 — Lee Westwood, 271
  • 1998 — Mathias Gronberg, 275
  • 1997 — Per-Ulrik Johansson, 267
  • 1996 — Per-Ulrik Johansson, 277
  • 1995 — Bernhard Langer, 280
  • 1994 — David Gilford, 275
  • 1993 — Gordon Brand Jr., 275
  • 1992 — Nick Faldo, 262
  • 1991 — Mike Harwood, 277
  • 1990 — Peter Senior, 267
  • 1989 — Andrew Murray, 277
  • 1988 — Ian Woosnam, 260
  • 1987 — Paul Way, 279
  • 1986 — Greg Norman, 269
  • 1985 — Bernhard Langer, 269
  • 1984 — Gordon Brand Jr., 270
  • 1983 — Isao Aoki, 274
  • 1982 — Manuel Pinero, 266
  • 1981 — Graham Marsh, 275
  • 1980 — Tom Kite, 284
  • 1979 — Sandy Lyle, 275
  • 1978 — Bobby Wadkins, 283